<%@LANGUAGE=VBScript%> Math Matters Level 3 - Chapter 10 - Lesson 1
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Cub Scouts go on a camping trip for the weekend. They gather ten logs for firewood.

It only takes one log to start the fire.

The Cub Scouts use one out of the ten logs to start the fire.

One tenth of the group of logs is used. This fraction is written as 1/10.

Look at the square below. This is a tenths square. It is divided into ten equal parts. One of the ten parts is colored yellow. 1/10 is colored yellow.

A fraction represents parts of a whole amount. A decimal is another way to describe parts of a whole amount. The fraction for one tenth is 1/10. The decimal for one tenth is 0.1.


A decimal is a number with one or more digits to the right of the decimal.

The value of money is written in decimal form.

The amount, one dollar and thirty-five cents,
is written as $1.35

The zero in 0.1 tells us that the decimal amount is less than one.

For example, the Cub Scouts gathered the whole amount of 10 logs. They only used one part of the whole amount, so they used one tenth or 1/10 or 0.1.

In the dollar amount, $1.35, the number one that appears before the decimal tells us that there is one whole dollar and the numbers three and five that appear after the decimal describe part of another dollar. So, the amount is more than one dollar, but not quite two dollars. It is 1 dollar and 35 cents.

The Cub Scouts used only one log to start the fire, but they used another log to keep the fire going. So far, they have used two of the 10 logs. The square below shows two-tenths shaded. What would be the decimal amount for 2/10?

If you said 0.2, you are correct!

By the morning, the Cub scouts had used all of the logs. They used ten tenths of the logs.

One out of 10 logs = 0.1 (one tenth)
Two out of 10 logs = 0.2 (two tenths)
Three out of 10 logs = 0.3 (three tenths)
Four out of 10 logs = 0.4 (four tenths)
Five out of 10 logs = 0.5 (five tenths)
Six out of 10 logs = 0.6 (six tenths)
Seven out of 10 logs = 0.7 (seven tenths)
Eight out of 10 logs = 0.8 (eight tenths)
Nine out of 10 logs = 0.9 (nine tenths)
Ten out of 10 logs = 1 (whole amount)

Decimals are used to describe parts of a whole amount. Since the Cub Scouts used all of the logs, they used the whole amount. There is no decimal.

 

EXERCISES
Type your answer in the space provided.
Type the fraction and the decimal for each tenths square.
1.

 

fraction:

decimal:

 
2.

 

fraction:

decimal:

 
3.

 

fraction:

decimal:

 
4.

 

fraction:

decimal:

 
5.

 

fraction:

decimal:

 
Which decimal is closer to 0? Put an x by the correct answer.
6. 0.3
0.5
 
7. 0.6
0.1
 
8. 0.2
0.4
 
 
Which decimal is closer to 1? Put an x by the correct answer.
9. 0.6
0.9
 
10. 0.8
0.4
 
11. 0.1
0.3
 
 
Type > or < in each blank.
12. 0.4 0.6  
13. 0.7 0.2  
14. 0.1 0.9  
15. 0.5 0.8  

 

REVIEW
Use pencil and paper to solve the following.
 
Complete the number sentences.
1. 1 lb = __ oz
2. 1 kg = __ g
3. 16 oz = __ lb
 
Write the fractions.
4. one fifth
5. one seventh
6. one tenth
 
Solve using any strategy.
7.

Mary buys 3 boxes of pencils. There are 10 pencils in each box. How many pencils did she buy?

 

8.

You order 319 balloons. You receive 149 balloons. How many more balloons should you receive?

 

9.

There are 12 boys sitting at a square table. The same number of boys is sitting at each side. How many boys are sitting at each side of the table?

 

 
Multiply or Divide.
10. 40 x 5 =
11. 200 x 5 =
12. 30 x 6 =
13. 63 ÷ 9 =
14. 64 ÷ 8 =
15. 36 ÷ 4 =

 

Level 3
Chapter 10 Lesson 1
Additional Exercises
 
 
Use pencil and paper to solve the following.
Write the following amounts of money:
1. Three dollars and twenty-five cents.
2. One dollar and fifty cents.
3. Six dollars and twelve cents.
4. Ten dollars and nine cents.
Write a fraction and a decimal for each of the following.
5. Two out of ten.
6. Six out of ten.
7. One out of ten.
Write the expression and include >, <, or = for each of the following.
8. 0.6 __ 0.3
9. 0.1 __ 0.9
10. 6/10 __ 3/10
11. 1/10 __ 4/10

 

Bonus

What decimal is equal to 1/2?

 
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